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Episode 24: A WordPress business built on selling buttons

Keep it simple stupid.

Take your idea and cut it and half and then cut it in half again. Then pick the top 3 features of you product and cross off 2 of them. What do you have left?

Buttons.

I love the idea of Max Foundry’s button plugin because it solves such a simple problem. Don’t have the design chops or time to code some sweet CSS buttons? Let’s see how Dave Donaldson solved this issue and built a business around it.

Interview with Dave Donaldson of Max Foundry

Watch on YouTube

Listen to the audio version

Episode 24: A WordPress business built on selling buttons

 
 
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Keep it simple stupid

A popular Matt Report interview is with John Saddington — we chat about the power of focus and simplifying your message/product.

One of the hardest things to do as an entrepreneur is to “say no” to all the wonderful features and functions we want to build. Once we start adding more “stuff” to our products & offering we start getting spread thin. Not enough vertical focus or rinse/repeat systems are in place.

Here’s what I think you’re going to love about this interview — Dave started with buttons as his first product. Buttons!

From there, he took this simple solution and grew other products. Built a nice base of folks to market to and then capitalized.

Don’t miss this episode especially if you’re just launching your new business!

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3 comments on “Episode 24: A WordPress business built on selling buttons

  1. So true about what you guys were saying about how important it is to push through a project to completion. If anything the case for focusing on something narrower like buttons is that it increases the likelihood that the project reaches its milestones in a timely fashion.
    I have a bunch of harder projects but now I’m just about to release something that’s much smaller in scope, but something I’ve taken a lot of time to get ‘right’. It’s when I have too many of those bigger obstacles (multiple versions of that media library example) that things tend to get put on the slow burner.

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